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Speed work makes the dream work!

Fly Feet Racing

 

Picture this, you’re in a race, running in a pack. All of a sudden someone breaks away. You find yourself wanting to go with that runner, but your legs will not move and you’re left in the dust. Maybe that’s dramatic, but maybe, you’ve been on the other side. You’re the one who breaks away!

 

This month of Stride we are combining threshold and speed training to make you a lethal racer. You’ll be able to run faster for longer, and then turn on the jets to pass others down that finishing stretch.

 

We visited threshold training in January, but we are bringing it back because it is an important training mechanism for runners. Threshold is the point where your body has accumulated lactate in its blood and is now producing it faster than your body can clear it. You’ve felt it before. Your lungs and chest are burning, your legs feel heavy. Threshold is the upper limits of what we consider sustainable efforts. This training works because it allows runners to maintain a faster pace over a longer period of time. I’m looking at you 5k runners and up! This is training that allows you to find consistency in your pace.

 

Now let’s talk about speed. We all want to be fast. Speed does not always come naturally and can be something you improve on. Speed training incorporates short bursts of very fast running, usually done at quarter miles or shorter, faster than your mile pace.  

 

You want to create muscle confusion in your training, especially if you are a distance runner. If you only train at one speed, you will only run one speed. You want to be able to run a consistent pace but still have the ability to throw in a surge and distance yourself from the competition. Speed training increases efficiency at all running paces making you faster at all distances.

 

Each class will incorporate speed work either before, during, or after the bulk of threshold work, so your pace is never the same throughout. You’ll see how your body responds to this type of training so you have an idea of when to throw in a surge, and have the confidence to finish your race with a kick!

 

All Hail the TreadMighty,

 

Megan